Catechists Blog

SCOTUS Has Provided us with a Great Opportunity to Evangelize

Posted by on Jun 27, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

The reality of SCOTUS’ decision should not surprise anyone. Many, myself included were sounding the alarm for years that this was eventually going to happen. There was a naive sense that the legalization of same-sex marriage would at best be left up to the states. The human reality of this decision reveals an intimate developemnt that should not only prepare us to evangelize but catechize. What I mean by this is the establishment of a “new catechism of love” by the five Justices of the Supreme Court who affirmed the rite to same-sex marriage.

This “new catechism of love” echoes what the Prophet Isaiah warned about the rebellious people who “. . . carry out a plan, but not mine; and who make a league, but not my spirit, that they may add sin to sin . . . (29:1). In essence this is what the five Supreme Court Justices have done. They have positoned themselves to be the new moral law of the land thus creating a “new catechism of love” that has no distinction between man and woman, nor takes into consideration the well-being of children, the authentic definition of a hetrosexual marital relationship or the proper defense of life and the dignity of the human person. Instead we have by the personal perspective of a few a definition of love that can mean anything to anyone to satisfy one’s own personal gratification.

An Opportunity to Evangelize

The book of Proverbs tells us that whoever loves discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid (12:1). SCOTUS’ decison while a supposed bruise to the natural order of the human condition does not destroy it. On the contrary it provides us with a great opportunity to witness the authenticity and sacredness of marriage and the reasonableness to witness the joy of authentic love between one man and one woman in holy matrimony. Heterosexual marriage is not extinct though the Supreme Courts ruling may imply this. The Catechism reminds us that the vocation of marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator (CCC 1603). SCOTUS knows it is not the author of marriage, but through its decision proposes to establish in essence a new moral order that rejects God’s creation of man out of love who is created in His image and likeness who Himself is love (CCC 1604).

Again, we have a unique opportunity to express the beauty of marriage and clearly live out our dignity as children of God. We must remind everyone in love that God seals the mutual consent of spouses in marriage and desires a covenantal relationship with us. God established the marriage bond (CCC 1640) which means our call is to live out this bond with joy and grace. Consider these threee points the next time you have an opportunity to discuss the beauty and sacredness of marriage:

1. Be genuine in your evangelism, mirror the image of God toward others.
2. Fidelity and charity must work hand in hand.
3. Ignorance in most cases has become personal doctrine, do not attack, clarify.

Remember, the conversion of hearts begins with how much we are able to love.

How Does the Feast of the Sacred Heart help us Discern for or against God?

Posted by on Jun 12, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

How Does the Feast of the Sacred Heart help us Discern for or against God?

Imagine if you were completely docile to the will of God. At first you may think highly unlikely due to the challenges of original sin and our own narcissistic tendencies. However what if God placed a unique and burning desire in your heart to proclaim and exalt Him especially through His Son Christ Crucified. God in His loving goodness constantly desires a covenantal relationship with his children. The prophet Jeremiah reminds us of this fact where God affirms that He will make a covenant with Israel by placing the law within them and writing it in their hearts (31:33).

Incarnational Reality

An often overlooked aspect of our own distinctive nature is that we are offered the opportunity to share the Incarnational reality of the Son of God Jesus Christ in the holy sacrifice of the Mass. The events surrounding His Paschal Mystery culminating in His death and resurrection reflect a sacrificial willingness to embrace our sinful ways through His loving heart. St. Paul in his letter to the Galatians echoes the Incarnational reality this way:

I have been crucified with Christ, it is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me; and the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me (2:20).

Our Moral Responsibility                     

One of the greatest attributes of the Feast of the Sacred Heart is its emphasis on the union between Christ and man. This may sound obvious to many but when we truly reflect and pray the Litany to Sacred Heart the culminating thrust of this prayer is salvation, trust, communion, renunciation of sin, and hope that leads to our eternal rest in Heaven.

Part of our moral responsibility is exercising the virtues of prudence in temperance because these virtues help us identify and understand the need to seek the will of God and be in communion with Him through His Son Jesus Christ. Thus our moral responsibility is keenly etched in our active participation in the Mass (CCC 1325).

Discerning for and against God

A perfectly good way of discerning for or against God is to engage in the recitation of the Lord’s Prayer (Our Father). Whatever your current religious state with God may be, it doesn’t hurt to remove yourself for a brief period of time from the distractions of the world and discern God’s will. The Lord’s Prayer offers us several propositions; He is Father, He is with us, He is Holy, and His will permeates both Heaven and earth. This means that man has a unique place in His heart. In other words He loves us so much that He gave us “our daily bread” in the form of His Son Jesus Christ crucified for the salvation of all humanity. On top of this, we are offered the opportunity to seek His mercy and in turn show mercy toward others culminating in the request to avoid the near occasion of sin and be delivered from all evil. This is why when we read the institution of the Lord’s Prayer in Mt 6:7-13 Christ directs his disciples to establish an intimate relationship with the Father and not with the world.

The Catechism reminds us:

The prayer of the Church venerates and honors the Heart of Jesus just as it invokes his most holy name. It adores the incarnate Word and his Heart which, out of love for men, he allowed to be pierced by our sins (2669).

Discerning for or against God does not mean discerning whether you like God or not. This discernment revolves around a genuine and intentional desire to seek someone greater than one’s self. It’s the first step in orienting ourselves to God the Father if we so desire and if we do then the reality of His Son Jesus Christ begins to make sense.

St. Thomas Aquinas alludes to this very point where he calls the Lord’s Prayer the most perfect of prayers because in it we ask not only for the things we can rightly desire, but also in the sequence that they should be desired. This prayer not only teaches us to ask for things, but also in what order we should desire them (STh II-II, 83, 9).

The gift of the Sacred Heart echoes St. Thomas’ points on the things we rightly desire because it is the devotion to the Sacred Heart where we have the opportunity to properly order our desires to Him and in turn helps us discern for or against God. It introduces the opportunity to seek Him from above and avoid the things of the earth (Col 3:3). Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us!

In Times of Confusion the Feast of Corpus Christi Makes Sense

Posted by on Jun 7, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

In Times of Confusion the Feast of Corpus Christi Makes Sense

Every time I hear the phrase “the grass isn’t always greener on the other side” I often wonder what was so bad about the side you were in. It begs to ask the question; “what was missing that made you leave in the first place?” Blessed Cardinal Newman tells us to; “take things as we find them: let us not attempt to distort them into what they are not… We cannot make facts. All our wishing cannot change them. We must use them.” This is a very poignant statement because it directs the human condition to recognize and affirm what humanity has received and that is an imagery that reflects God’s love for His children.

This imagery embraces greater significance when God sends forth His Son begotten not made, born of a Virgin maiden with the faculties encompassing both Divinity and humanity. He did this so that we would clearly see the love He has for us through Jesus Christ. The Christian narrative reflects an opportunity to squelch any confusion about our identity because this narrative is fully realized in Jesus Christ who is both Savior and King. The Catechism lays out a beautiful “Proclamation” emphasizing our clear identity with Christ;

We believe and confess that Jesus of Nazareth, born a Jew of a daughter of Israel at Bethlehem at the time of King Herod the Great and the emperor Caesar Augustus, a carpenter by trade, who died crucified in Jerusalem under the procurator Pontius Pilate during the reign of the emperor Tiberius, is the eternal Son of God made man. He “came from God,” “descended from heaven,” and “came in the flesh.” For “the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, full of grace and truth; we have beheld his glory, glory as of the only Son from the Father…. And from his fullness have we all received, grace upon grace (423).

The Seed of Doubt leads to Confusion

Our human condition has a difficult time embracing what is actually good for us. We tend to dive toward an alternative mindset that is always looking for the next best thing. And if we can’t find the next best thing we immediately begin to distort the actually reality of things as Blessed Newman alludes to. The seed of distortion receives its nourishment from the fear of suffering. What I mean here is the fear of not wanting to sacrifice for the sake of anyone person or thing. Since the loss of the preternatural gifts due to the fall of our first parents, the notion of having to suffer for something doesn’t immediately appeal to the human appetite. On the contrary we find ways to distort this reality instead of embracing suffering as an actual gift of grace. St. Peter reminds to;

. . . not be surprised at the fiery ordeal which comes upon you to reprove you, as though something strange were happening to you. But rejoice in so far as you share Christ’s sufferings, that you may also rejoice and be glad when his glory is revealed. If you are reproached for the name of Christ, you are blessed, because the spirit of glory and of God rests upon you (1 Pt 4:12-16).

The Gift of Corpus Christi

When one begins to take account the significance of Corpus Christ and how this feast reminds us of what Christ did at the Last Supper the state of perpetual confusion many of us tend to live by begins to actually subside. St. Mark reminds us;

And as they were eating, he took bread and blessed, and broke it, and gave it to them and said, take; this is my body. And he took a chalice, and when he had given thanks he gave it to them and they all drank of it. And he said to them, this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many. Truly I say to you O shall not drink again of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God (14:22-25).

The gift of the Holy Eucharist simply put is the primordial gift left by Christ to keep us on the path of redemption to Heaven. The significance of the Holy Eucharist is the fact that He took on human nature to save us from the state of moral and spiritual confusion causing us to replace Christ’s narrative with a false one. The institution of the Holy Eucharist serves as a reminder of the perpetual sacrifice offered at Mass (CCC 1323).

St. John reminds us that Christ is the living bread that came down from heaven (6:51) for the sole purpose of experiencing the joy of Christ’s love for us. The Feast of Corpus Christ makes sense because the purpose of the Eucharist is to:

Reconcile us with God; to know God’s love; to be our model of holiness; to make us partakers of the divine nature (CCC 457-460).

These reasons sanctify our own human condition to Christ Himself and in so doing clarifies our relationship with Him avoiding the temptation of trying to find an alternative that no matter how hard you try just doesn’t seem to work.

Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that is due time he may exalt you (1 Pt 5:6).

Is the Trinity Too Much of a Mystery to Understand?

Posted by on May 31, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

Is the Trinity Too Much of a Mystery to Understand?

A common phrase I hear all too often about the doctrine of the Trinity is that “it’s a mystery” and that’s all you really need to know. Followed by; “Just make the Sign of the Cross and be on your way.” This unfortunate catechetical reality immediately negates the opportunity to draw someone into God’s Trinitarian narrative. Simply applying the label “mystery” doesn’t give our Lord due justice for revealing Himself in systematic and loving way.

G.K. Chesterton once said that “One of the chief uses of religion is that it makes us remember our coming from darkness, the simple fact that we are created.” Chesterton’s point is very poignant when one begins to extrapolate the beautiful doctrine of the Trinity and realize that God is truly our Father and Lord. And because He is our Father, the creator of heaven and of earth, He continuously reveals Himself to us in ways we can understand and engage him more clearly, if we pay attention.

If this is the case, then the Trinity is not merely a concept of three different persons with three different natures. It is God first and foremost who chose to reveal Himself ever more through the begetting of a Son and establish a perpetual communication through the Holy Spirit. Thus we are not talking about three Gods but one God with three distinct persons. Let’s keep in mind that the principal aim of the sign of the Cross is a clear and unambiguous designation that we are Christians united to the Triune God.

God Does Reveal Himself

We often overlook how many times God actually reveals Himself in Sacred Scripture e.g. when he told Moses “I am who am” (Ex 3:14), or the acknowledgement that “our God is One God (Deut. 6:4-7). Jesus reminds us that he and the Father are one (Jn 10:30). We see this union more clearly at Jesus’ baptism (Mt 3:13-17) where Jesus is the Son of God become man and is identified so by the Father and confirmed by the Holy Spirit descending upon Jesus.

The Catechism reminds us that we believe in one God, not three. Each Person is God, whole and entire (CCC 253). “The mystery of the Most Holy Trinity is the central mystery of the Christian faith and of Christian life” (CCC 261). One of the striking images the Trinity offers us is the love of a Father to his children so much so that He chooses to reveal Himself more intimately by begetting a Son in human form and then providing us the opportunity to see His son more clearly through the Divine messenger in the Holy Spirit.

The Error of Simply Saying “It’s a Mystery”

Merely identifying the Blessed Trinity as a foreign concept that cannot be understood reduces the whole creation narrative of why we even exist in the image and likeness of God. It is true that the Blessed Trinity is “the mystery” of all mysteries but this doesn’t mean we’re unable to understand the basic Trinitarian concept about God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

A simple way of looking at the Trinity is through example of water. When frozen, water turns into ice, when heated or boiled it evaporates and you witness the steam coming from a pan. And then you have water in liquid form, three distinct properties but still the same nature (water-liquid). Keep in mind that each member of the Blessed Trinity possesses the whole nature of God as his own. This means that God is God as God, God is God as the Son and God is God as the Holy Spirit. Each has its own unique character possessing the same Divine nature.

It is a grave error on the part of anyone to dismiss the Trinity as something that is beyond someone’s reach. We know that the Trinity is three persons in One God (CCC 202, 251, 253). God transcends all human understanding of Himself meaning He is above us all (CCC 42; 212). He is also immanent where we share a unique and intimate relationship with Him because He is constantly preparing us for the divine life (CCC 239; 300-305).

Let’s not forget that God does want to share His life with us (2 Pet 1:4). One of the most striking facts about the Blessed Trinity is that we are intimately tied to the Father, Son and Holy Spirit by virtue of our creation and baptism. We adore and worship the Father who is the source of all, whereas the Son became the Incarnate Word and bore the sins of humanity (CCC 1077-1110). The Holy Spirit brings us into a living relationship with Christ (CCC 1101). The Holy Spirit helps us respond to this communion.

Our Place in the “Mystery”

God transcends truth, beauty and goodness. This means that he is above all things because He is God (CCC 214-221). Let’s keep in mind that He sent His son to “bear witness to the truth” (Jn 18:37). The mystery that many say cannot be understood seems pretty clear when we place our Lord within the context of the Son and the Holy Spirit at Pentecost (Acts 2). This Divine evidence does affirm a certain narrative that we are intimately drawn into God’s story by virtue of our creation and baptism. Our very being is wired to become an integral part of God’s story which in reality is no mystery that cannot be understood.

 

Is Jesus Christ at Odds with the Teachings of the Catholic Church?

Posted by on May 19, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

Is Jesus Christ at Odds with the Teachings of the Catholic Church?

Have you ever wondered if Jesus actually believed everything He taught to those around Him? This is an out of the box type of question but it’s one that is gaining momentum amongst people who wish to defend a personal position contrary to the teachings of the Catholic Church.  Their method is to use Christ and somehow convince people that we he taught was an openness to embrace a golden rule of loving everyone but leaving the person to their own devices with no attempt at a genuine conversion of heart to Christ Himself.

Our human condition is both a great gift from God and at the same a great curse by our own free will. What was originally created with the fullness of grace in mind is now involved in a drama of right and wrong choices, moral and immoral impulses and everything else in between. It appears when Jesus Christ, the Son of God, the Word made flesh becomes too much for us to handle, we in turn fashioned Him into our own version of the Golden Calf to fulfill our own devices.

The letter to the Hebrews tells us that it is impossible to please God without faith, since anyone who comes to him must believe that he exists, and that he rewards those who try to find him (11:6). The funny thing about this Scripture passage is the last few words; “those who try to find him.” And “try” is the operative word. When Moses was delayed from coming down the mountain Israel’s impatience and still lingering pagan sensibilities gathered and encouraged Aaron to discard Moses as their leader and instead championed a “new way” of satisfying their moral tastes and likings through the fashioning of a golden calf. Sacred Scripture tells us that Aaron did just that and the end result was the slaughter of over three thousand men and the affliction of another plague thrown upon the people of Israel by God (Ex 32). As we can see with the example of the Golden Calf Israel’s insistence to refashion God led to a series of events that did not end in their favor.

A Catechetical Refashioning  of Jesus Christ

The reality of this story is that it still continues to this day. The latest example of refashioning Christ to fit a new moral norm occurred on the campus of Seton Hall University where a popular Priest and campus minister Fr. Warren Hall was fired from his duties for supporting gay marriage on his Twitter and Facebook page. As one might expect, a group of individuals protested his firing invoking the name of Jesus Christ and Pope Francis to legitimize their position.

The underpinning of this group’s argument is not so much invoking Jesus Christ and Pope Francis to defend their position, instead it’s the attempt to refashion Jesus Christ and Pope Francis, if that is even possible in order to promote a new form of doctrinal conformity, one that would deny any authentic remnant of Christ-centered thought. The Catechism reminds us that; the way of Christ “leads to life”; a contrary way “leads to destruction.” (1696)

We should not assume that the attempt to refashion Christ is a new phenomenon. At first glance we should look at what would drive people to reclassify Church teaching to fit their personal lifestyle. If we really take a closer look at this phenomenon we should look no further than the specific catechetical instruction of the last forty years consisting of the “Jesus loves you” lesson plan with no reasonable explanation as to “why He loves us”, or, the emphasis to embrace the Resurrected Christ (happy) versus the Crucified Christ (gory). A sponsor in an RCIA class I was teaching commented to me that “Jesus was a pacifist.” I asked him to explain how Jesus’ crucifixion was a sign of pacifism. His response, “I hadn’t thought about that.”

Jesus Christ and the Golden Rule

Christ asks us to meditate and imitate him (Jn 8:12). These two requests lay the groundwork to freely and lovingly embrace the Gospel intimately and lovingly uniting ourselves with the Father and the Holy Spirit. These two seeds of mediation and imitation forge the Law of the Gospel which requires us to make the decisive choice between “the two ways” and to put into practice the words of the Lord which is summed up in the Golden Rule, Whatever you wish that men would do to you, do so to them; this is the law and the prophets (CCC 1907).

The Church of Jesus Christ

To imply that Jesus Christ Himself would somehow be at odds with His own message of the Kerygma is simply senseless. It reveals a more ignorant and at the same time sinister approach to undermine the Deposit of Faith and refashion the Golden Rule. Man’s very essence is deistic in that we are created in the image and likeness of God. Our baptism reflects this image upon entering His Kingdom. One of the gifts of Baptism is the opportunity to seek a more intimate union with Christ. Baptism gives us the opportunity to be one with God and be of single heart and mind with Him. We become open to the light of reason if we so choose and disposes us to listen based on right reason. Hence we become members of the body of Christ the Church by which he instituted at Pentecost.

Let us continue to pray for our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ, especially those who may not fully understand the gift of their faith nor see the light of reason that the Church of Christ actually provides for them. One of the greatest acts we can participate to foster unity of the faithful is to engage in the act of prayer affirming our faith and conformity to God. St. Francis De Sales describes this act in these terms;

Christian doctrine clearly proposes unto us the truths which God wills that we should believe, the goods he will have us hope, for the pains he will have us dread, what he will have us love, the commandments he will have us observe, and the counsels he desires us to follow. And this is called God’s signified will, because he has signified and made manifest unto us that it is his will and intention that all this should be believed, hoped for, feared, loved, and practiced.

 Treatise on the Love of God, Book VIII, Ch. III, pp. 329-330

Should We Criminalize Morality?

Posted by on Mar 10, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

Should We Criminalize Morality?

A cold heard reality sets in when the mere thought of holding someone morally accountable is met with outright contempt. The day of simply looking at the truth of the matter because “it’s the truth of the matter” does not appear to resonate with some people and in some cases even less than others. In other words you or I should supposedly think twice before holding someone moral accountable for their actions.

The scenario is currently playing out against Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone of the Archdiocese of San Francisco who chose to exercise his right to do so. The crime supposedly committed by this person of moral authority was requiring his employees i.e. teachers who work in catholic schools to faithfully adhere to the moral standards set by the Church. His request was viewed as “discriminatory” for requiring his employees to live by a basic moral standard. The irony here is that we are talking about his employees who work in his religious institutions where religion is taught.

Criminalizing Morality

Archbishop Salvatore Cordileone has been accused of being a discriminatory employer whose actions of moral authority requiring his teachers to adhere to the moral teachings of the Church are viewed as criminal. The characterized “criminalization” of Archbishop Cordileone’s right to ask his employees to faithfully exercise sound moral standards is a reality that is now becoming commonplace. Anyone with a basic sense of right and wrong would see that the Archbishop’s position and that of the Church does not incite or imply discrimination. Nor does it impede a person’s freedom in anyway. On the contrary, a sound understanding of moral truth prospers and advances man’s freedom to act without reservation on the basic tenets of life; do what is good, avoid what is evil. The supposed logic in not adhering to a moral code rests on a basic secular principal that morality hinders and limits human freedom. Any attempt to withhold the freedom of the human being from acting or partaking in their own way of living is simply seen as affront to their identity as persons. Even though the moral standard I am speaking of i.e. the “rule of faith” which consists of the Ten Commandments and the Beatitudes breathes an openness to live life in charity amongst one another, its basic standard appears to be too much for these employees and those who are in agreement with them to bear.

Let’s keep in mind that Archbishop Cordileone’s crime was implementing language based on the Catechism of the Catholic Church regarding sexual morality. His role as Chief Shepherd of his diocese is not only being called into question, it is being implied by public civic authorities as something not applicable to the teachers who teach in his diocese. In other words, the rule of the city of San Francisco trumps the rule of faith in the eyes of the city government even though they have no right to a position on the matter.

 

The Premise of a Catholic School Teacher  

Lost in all the mayhem is the question of what is the actual role of a catholic school teacher?  y a teacher “teaches” in a catholic school. An important distinction we need to make when speaking of catholic school teachers is that they are both evangelists and catechists first and foremost. Their ministerial responsibility is to bring each and every student into a personal and intimate and relationship with Jesus Christ (CT, 5).

Every teacher in a catholic school by nature of their mission is called to present an authentic witness of the Gospel which in short is called the “Kerygma.” The kerygma simply means an authentic witness of the Gospel in an organic and visible way. In other words the teacher is by nature of his ministry a living witness i.e. a disciple of Jesus Christ. If this wasn’t brought up when a teacher applied to work in the Archdiocese of San Francisco then I can see why there is such disdain and defiance toward the language in their contracts.

St. Paul reminds us that we are called to enlighten all men to the riches of Christ and to the dispensation of the mysteries which has been hidden from eternity in God (Eph 3:8). The responsibility of any sound catholic school teacher is to give their students regardless of the academic discipline a clear knowledge of the faith. The key is not how much of the Catechism we can ram down their throats which is what is perceived by these dissenting teachers. The actual goal is to help and foster students into authentic religious living i.e. living an authentic sacramental life rooted in Christ. And this is precisely what Archbishop Cordileone is doing which is his right as Archbishop.

A Call to Prayer

Should morality be criminalized? The answer is no regardless if a group of ignorant people feel it should be just because it should. One of the most important things we can do as faithful witnesses of the Gospel is pray, especially for those persecuted for defending Christ in the public square. Archbishop Cordileone is exercising his moral right to uphold the teachings of the Church and in turn care for the souls of his flock even for those who have no desire for such a gift. Let’s keep Archbishop Cordileone in our prayers as he cares and navigates his flock toward Christ. Our Lady of Good Counsel, pray for us!

Does the Act of Prayer Threaten You?

Posted by on Mar 5, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

Does the Act of Prayer Threaten You?

Have you ever encountered someone who felt threatened by the mere thought of praying? One could assume that if anyone would remotely be threatened by prayer it would either by the hardened Atheist or the Devil and his underlings. But the question is; why would anyone be threatened by prayer? Perhaps its a person who is worried what he may discover about himself if he does pray. Or maybe he will come to the realization of something he’s been avoiding for a long time. Regardless of the situation, it’s not at all impossible to encounter someone who simply views prayer as a threat.

The basic act of prayer simply requires us to go beyond ourselves and seek the counsel of God. One of the consequences of man’s fall from grace due to original sin is that we tend to seek the glorification of ourselves rather than glorifying God. Prayer in relation to God is an act of deference toward Him. This outward-inward act can be quite a challenge for anyone who sees the art of prayer as a threat for whatever the reason.

St. John Damascene describes prayer as:

“a raising of one’s mind and heart to God or the requesting of good things from God.”

Our communication with God is a natural byproduct of our creation. We are naturally wired to pray, the key is whether we choose to pray in order to have an intimate communion with Him. The act of Prayer whether through remote prayers (general intercession) or proximate prayers (Our Father, Hail Mary etc.) offers us the opportunity to walk with Him and keep our mind free from the distractions of the world. The very gift of prayer which is a grace is exactly what the Devil does not want us to experience and enjoy. The Devil’s joy so to speak is that we don’t pray to his enemy.

In his famous Screwtape Letters C.S. Lewis writes about the pain Screwtape experiences every time the “patient” prays. For example Screwtape encourages his underling Wormwood to keep the “patient” from developing an authentic prayer life. The reason behind this is fairly simple, the more the “patient” prays that harder it will be to distract him from God. The last thing Screwtape wants to see is someone walking with God (Book Four).

The Catechism of the Catholic Church reminds us that prayer is a genuine conversation with God which in turn leads to a desire for grace (CCC 2558). Screwtape is adamant about leading the “patient” away from God because his intent is to keep things out of the “patients” mind. The more the “patient” focuses on himself and the temptations of the world the less he will direct his attention toward communicating with God.

Alleviating the Threat and the Gift of Adoration

Something to consider when threatened by the prospect of praying is to consider the prayer of Adoration. This method of prayer offers us the opportunity to see something greater than ourselves and in turn helps us to gradually develop an intimate relationship with Jesus Christ. Why Adoration? Because the spiritual practice of Adoration exalts the greatness of the Lord who made us (Ps 24:9-10) and the almighty power of the Savior who sets us free from evil. Adoration is an opportunity to give homage to God in respectful silence (Ps 24:9-10). The prayer of Adoration serves as a spiritual filter allowing us to have a fixed gaze on Christ and avoid distractions that may divert our attention from Him and squelch any perceived threats.

Adoration is the first attitude of man acknowledging that he is a creature before his Creator. It exalts the greatness of the Lord who made us and the almighty power of the Savior who sets us free from evil. Adoration is homage of the spirit to the “King of Glory,” respectful silence in the presence of the “ever greater” God. Adoration of the thrice-holy and sovereign God of love blends with humility and gives assurance to our supplications (CCC 2628).

The Kingdom Is For All

We are reminded that we are part of a holy nation (1 Pet 2:9) and that we are the salt of the earth (Mt 5:13-16). For these very reasons we have a free and natural response to pray to someone greater than ourselves. The very act of prayer should not be a cause for spiritual alarm or despair in thinking that you cannot possibly pray to God or that He can’t possibly here what you have on your mind and in your heart. On the contrary, the gift of prayer is the simple opportunity God forged in our very hearts to speak with Him. Even though we are sinners, God is merciful to His children (Lk 18-9-14) which grants us the opportunity to see prayer as an opportunity and not a threat. St. Thomas Aquinas for example described the Lord’s Prayer as the “most perfect of prayers . . .” because its petitions directly call us to live out our Baptismal call.

The next time you encounter a threatening situation involving prayer, invoke the name of Jesus Christ. The Catechism reminds us:

The invocation of the holy name of Jesus is the simplest way of praying always. When the holy name is repeated often by a humbly attentive heart, the prayer is not lost by heaping up empty phrases, but holds fast to the word and “brings forth fruit with patience.” This prayer is possible “at all times” because it is not one occupation among others but the only occupation: that of loving God, which animates and transfigures every action in Christ Jesus (CCC 2668).

How To Deal With Temptation

Posted by on Feb 10, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

How To Deal With Temptation

When one speaks of temptation, it tends to carry a negative connotation because it is often attributed to something we shouldn’t do. However, I would propose that the art of temptation reveals a certain beauty in that a person is faced with a decision to either act out the temptation or not. Whether the decision takes a split-second or is carefully drawn out, a dilemma ensues as to whether the person should or shouldn’t. What we have here is a battle between an attraction that is contrary to right reason and judgment against God’s commandments.

Let’s keep in mind that our first parents faced this situation in a somewhat drawn out process orchestrated by the devil himself. Temptation abounding, the serpent proposed the forbidden tree and its fruit was more tantalizing than all of the others combined. What the serpent offered to our first parents was to think outside of themselves and disregard right reason i.e. God (Gen 3:1-7).

St. Paul sheds light on this interior conflict and battle with temptation and right reason when he shares his own struggles with doing the very things he should avoid but stills does them anyway;

Did that which is good then bring death to me? By no means! It was sin, working death in me through what is good, in order that sin might be shown to be sin, and through the commandment might become sinful beyond measure. We know that the law is spiritual; but I am carnal, sold under sin. I do understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. . . (Rom 7:13-15)

When faced with temptation to do something we know we shouldn’t, we do it anyway. Our immediate rationalization is the satisfaction our human appetite regardless of how we feel afterwards. Pascal reflects this idea further in his Penses:

“Being unable to cure death, wretchedness and ignorance, men have decided, in order to be happy, not to think such things” (133).

In a split second we blind ourselves from reality through a perversion of the senses. The problem many of us face is our continual need to live in a blind state of mind.

The Nature of Temptation

The nature of temptation rests in man’s desire to seek an alternative to God’s love. This proposition can only appear to last so long, eventually the alternatives to God’s love do not adequately fulfill the appetite of temptation. We recall that the original disobedience exercised by Lucifer against our Father in Heaven revealed the decisive choice of self-love over a devout love to God. Lucifer and his legion specifically chose their own perverted ideal of love versus God’s love. Their seductive voices resonate a desire to disobey out of envy (Gen 3:1-5; Wis 2:24).

The First Order of Temptation 

You will be like God. (Gen 3:5) What is Temptation; an attraction from outside oneself or from within, to act contrary to right reason and the commandments of God. The Catechism reminds us: “Tempting God consists in putting his goodness and almighty power to the test by word and deed.  [See: Lk 4:9; Deut 6:16] The challenge contained in such temptations toward God wounds the respect and trust we owe our Creator and Lord. It always harbors doubt about his love, his providence, and his power” (CCC 2119).

Keep in mind; we have indulged ourselves to become a centrist society. Our understanding of the world at times shuns the truth, beauty, and, goodness of who God and the created order of things. In other words, I am no longer a child of God but a child of myself. When we convince ourselves that our own self-fulfillment is more important than our relationship with Jesus Christ our appetite for self-fulfillment will never end and thus never be satisfied. Only in Christ can man fill the void in him.

Enduring the Trial of Temptation

Sacred Scripture tells us that Jesus was tempted three times (Lk 4:1-13) while in the desert for forty days and nights.

  1. Turn stone into bread
  2. Authority over all the kingdoms will be given for complete worship of the Devil i.e. renounces God the Father.
  3. Throw himself from the cliff questioning the faith and the power of God.

An important point to remember as Jesus began his journey into the desert was that he was filled with the power of the Holy Spirit. This reflects Jesus’ awareness of the evil forces around him aimed to thwart His mission. We would do well to follow Christ’s example of preparedness through faithful prayer, adherence to the law (Ten Commandments), and faithfully living a sacramental life. A good starting point is immersing ourselves in God’s mercy by making an examination of conscience, shunning those elements of our lifestyle that leads us into temptation and making a concerted effort to receive the sacrament of penance. There is no reason why we should lose all inhibitions over a tempting situation fostering a negative result. St. James provides sound advice on “enduring trials”:

“Blessed is the man who endures trial, for when he has stood the test he will receive the crown of life which God has promised to those who love him. Let no one say when he is tempted. ‘I am tempted by God”; for God cannot be tempted with evil and he himself tempts no one; but each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire.” (1:12-14)

 “. . . and lead us not into temptation but deliver is from evil.”

The second to last petition of the Our Father reflects our desire to not concede to temptation due to our transgression i.e. our trespasses. What this means is a genuine desire of the human heart to combat evil and not fall prey to the emptiness of false gods. There is a two-fold approach to this petition. One: not to yield to temptation; Two: not to be allowed to enter into temptation (See: Mt 26:41). We must remember, God does not tempt anyone and he cannot be tempted by the Devil (CCC 2846).

As a final point, St. Paul provides comforting words on the issue of temptation and how we can understand the power of God’s love regardless of the trials we face;

“No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your strength, but with the temptation will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it” (1 Cor 10:13).

Do you want to be a Catechist then Listen to St. John Bosco

Posted by on Jan 31, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

Do you want to be a Catechist then Listen to St. John Bosco

One of the chief uses of religion is that it makes us remember our coming from darkness, the simple fact that we are created.

 G.K. Chesterton

As with anything in life, if you want to do something worthwhile then do it well. If your desire is to be a catechist then your aim should be the salvation of souls. This is the fundamental aim of a catechist’s mission. It’s not simply regurgitating information, on the contrary, its leading a soul under your care to seek an intimacy with Christ beyond measure. This means providing an authentic witness of the loving Gospel where you practice what you preach since students learn more from an authentic witness of the faith. This requires a responsibility to know your students and proclaim the basic principles of the faith (Creed) if possible on a daily basis.

Part of a catechist’s responsibility is to promote the Gospel message and that Christian living provides enjoyment which hopefully will lead to a conversion of heart. Within this process is the important theological virtue of love which drives the catechist’s ability to catechize. The virtue of love served as the basis for St. John Bosco’s oratory for boys and girls and was the basis of his catechetical system of formation. St. John Bosco was in short one of the greatest teachers of the Catholic faith, especially in reaching the young men of his day. His proving ground was the very difficult streets of Turin, Italy where the theological virtue of charity was more hoped for than seen on a daily basis. Knowing the environment he had to work with Don Bosco made it his aim for “his boys” to see themselves as children of God. He desired to “save their souls.”

There was no miscommunication on St. John Bosco’s part to reach the souls of these boys. Because of his direct, stern, yet loving approach many children were taken aback on how direct he was towards them, a “fight fire with fire” approach but with Christ at the center.

The Identity of the Catechist

If you truly want to catechize then it must be a matter of the heart. This means a desire to reach the soul of the student and bring him into an active relationship with Jesus Christ. A good catechist introduces the virtue of love. A great catechist shows how to live it. We cannot forget that a void exists in life without religion. It leads to confusion, desolation, despair in a myriad of ways. These are some of the same characteristics we encounter in many of our students. Our responsibility is to identify these expressions of faith or lack thereof.

Our identity as catechists coincides with the understanding that we are always in the presence of God. A great catechist reveals the presence of God through their authentic witness of the Gospel but also through their acts of charity towards their students. One of the greatest charisms a catechist possesses is the ability to respect his students which in itself provides an understanding of religion as a way of life genuinely lived out and not a class.

If you want to be loved, you must love yourself, and the students must see the love of the teacher to the student.

Using St. John Bosco’s Preventive System

The Preventive System is an approach based on three core principles: Reason, Religion, and Kindness. Each principle has a specific point to bring the child closer to Christ.

The Principle of Reason provides a reasonable atmosphere where the child would be given the opportunity to consent to instruction and guidance. The goal of this first principle is to develop good Christians and useful citizens. The teacher must be the bridge to a child’s discovery of the world through patience, diligence, and prayer.

The Principle of Religion stressed the ugliness of sin and the value of living a virtuous life. The aim is to develop the intellectual and physical gifts the child possesses and how he can be directed toward a greater good. There are five steps within this principle to help youth attain personal holiness:

  1. Holiness of ordinary life
  2. The joy and optimism of holiness
  3. Centrality of Confession
  4. The Holy Eucharist
  5. Love of Mary

The Principle of Kindness emphasizes the virtue of love. St. John Bosco would stress: “Let us make ourselves loved, and we shall possess their hearts.” In other words, our Christian witness must be constant for the development of the child. The learning environment should be warm and inviting, not cold. The family spirit reigned; he did this through rapport, friendliness, presence, respect, attention, dedication to service, and personal responsibility.

The core of all three principles of the Preventive System is to draw the child away from a view that only he exists and no one else. As the last principle stressed; “the family spirit reigned.” We want the child to know that he is part of God’s plan by the very fact he was created in His image and likeness. This in turn will help the child view others in the same light.

What made St. John Bosco’s methods so effective was his willingness to go into the heart of the child regardless of his state in life and see Christ in him. Wisdom tells us these methods not only served St. John Bosco well; they can also reawaken our relationship with Christ. The goal is to foster productive Catholic citizens who seek to assist others before themselves. When teaching others about his preventive system St. John Bosco would always remind his students: “Get them to love you and they’ll follow you anywhere.”

St. John Bosco, patron of all Catechists, pray for us!

What the First Day in Catholic School Taught Me.

Posted by on Jan 27, 2015 in Catechesis, Christian Spirituality, Evangelization, General | 0 comments

What the First Day in Catholic School Taught Me.

The great Frank Sheed in his book Theology and Sanity wrote that;

Man is insufficient for himself, not only by the ill-use he has made of himself, but in any event. There must be clarity here. So many of our troubles flow from a defective use of the intelligence or will or energy we have, that we are in danger of thinking that all our troubles could be cured by a better use of our own powers – in other words, that man has the secret of sufficiency himself if he will but use it. (pg. 382)

Frank Sheed reminds us that “We can be our own worst enemy.” This statement probably resonates with most of us when engaged in the daily annals of life. As a cradle Catholic there were many times where I had an opportunity to learn more about my faith but for whatever reason didn’t, probably because of my own ignorance hence we can be our own worst enemy. The irony here is that it’s exactly what the Devil banks on.

Revelation and the Response of Faith

Baptism signifies entrance into the Kingdom of God and initiates our life in Christ. It also sets the stage to receive the fullness of God’s revelation through His Son Jesus Christ. But what if this journey is delayed? What if the significance of that baptismal event was left to simply waste away? Growing up in a cradle-Catholic Mexican household, this was the case. The notion of living a sacramental life was outweighed by devotion to Our Lady of Guadalupe. This type of cultural Catholic identity naturally disassociated me from many aspects of the Church especially the sacraments. Ironically, what brought me into direct contact with God’s revelation was my grandmother understanding the value of a sacramental life.

It was my holy grandmother who in not so many ways directed my mother to get with the program and have me and brother begin instruction to receive our first Holy Communion.

In other words grandma wanted her grandchildren to begin their road to Emmaus. What is so unique about the road to Emmaus is the opportunity Jesus takes as only a good teacher would to complete the catechetical training of His pupils. (See: Lk 24:12-35)

So there I was a fifth grader entering the dreaded CCD class for the very first time. My mother registered me and off I went. What I saw upon entering class for the first time was a group of kids wondering “what in the world am I doing here.” Somehow I knew this was going to be interesting when I asked my CCD teacher what CCD meant and she had no idea. Eventually I finished my requirements and made my First Confession and Holy Communion. So now I’m done and can go on with the rest of my life. But this was not to be.

Who is St. Matthew?

My grandmother, pleased I had made my First Holy Communion was not done with me. At her request, she made my mother enroll me in the local Catholic grade school because she knew well enough that a Catholic school is called to perpetuate sacramental living. After attending public school all my life here I was enrolled in seventh grade. I wondered what I had done to God to deserve this exile from reality. In hindsight, this was a wise decision. The first subject of my very first day of class was religion and it ended up being quite an experience. The teacher was a diminutive full habit Dominican nun named Sr. Carmen from Mexico City. Fellow classmates said she had hands of stone and the smile of Mother Teresa. As we settled into class with a Hail Mary the first lesson of the day required us to open our bible and turn to the Gospel of St. Matthew.

Now, keep in mind, my religious knowledge was less than exemplary. Knowledge of the bible paralleled my knowledge of nuclear fusion which was none. As Sr. Carmen began to walk up and down each aisle, sweat began to run profusely down my face. I had no idea where the Gospel of St. Matthew was or who he was. The thought of asking my fellow classmates did not cross my mind for the sole reason of not looking stupid. I asked myself; where is this Gospel of St. Matthew? At this point, something significant occurred forever changing my outlook about Jesus Christ’s love for us. I looked up as this imposing nun (4 ft. tall) began to walk down my aisle and I remember asking Jesus; “Jesus, if you are truly real and I am supposed to be here then tell me where to turn.” Right there and then I blindly opened the bible to the Gospel of St. Matthew 7:7-9;

“Ask, and it will be given you; seek and you will find; knock and it will be opened to you. For everyone who asks receives, and he who seeks finds, and to him who knocks it will be opened.”

As I looked at the passage, Sr. Carmen announced to the class to turn to Mt 7:7-9! Right there and then I became convinced God had a plan for my life. My Catholic education served as a distinct catalyst for my journey with Christ especially through the witness of teachers like Sr. Carmen and my Catholic high school professor Dennis Jacobelli. Both exemplified the gift of revelation and the response of faith. The reality of my faith became quite clear for me that Christ did have a plan for my life and He made it a point to tell me Himself.